2021年4月20日 4 20, 2021 EVENT REPORT TALK workshops

EVENT REPORT: Collaborative interdisciplinary course design: a case study from Tokyo College


Title: Collaborative interdisciplinary course design: a case study from Tokyo College
Date: April 20th, 17:00-18:30pm 

Access the recording of the event here.
 
Abstract:
 
Tokyo College is a young institute at the University of Tokyo founded to address some of global society’s pressing issues through interdisciplinary research, international network building and public engagement. With a critical mass of early career researchers taking up positions at the College last summer, we sought an opportunity to translate this mission into teaching. In this talk, we will present our effort to collaboratively design and teach a bilingual interdisciplinary undergraduate seminar entitled “The Earth and Human Society in 2050” in the framework of the university’s liberal arts program zengaku zemi. We will share our experience and take-aways and hope to start a conversation about potential future collaborations in interdisciplinary teaching across the university.
 
Shiori SHAKUTO is a Project Assistant Professor at Tokyo College. She is a social cultural anthropologist, and her research interests include gender, migration and environment. Prior to joining Tokyo College, she has taught a wide range of interdisciplinary courses including gender and development, ageing and technology and Japan Studies in Australia and Singapore. 
 
Michael Facius is Associate Professor at Tokyo College. He studies Japanese and East Asian culture from the perspective of global history, the history of knowledge and the history of translation. He holds diplomas in college teaching and e-teaching and has taught and supervised in Japanese Studies, East Asian Studies, History, Global History, Transnational Studies and Chinese Health and Humanity at Freie Universität Berlin, University College London, the University of Tokyo and during ERASMUS lectureships at Leiden and Cambridge.
 
Marcin JARZEBSKI is a Project Assistant Professor at Tokyo College and a sustainability science and natural environmental science expert. He is doing research on ageing and shrinking societies globally, food security in Sub-Saharan Africa, climate change adaptation in Southeast Asia, community forest management in the Philippines, and working actively on collaborations aiming for a new design for future society. He had several occasions to teach in the field of environmental sustainability.
 

abm00024313

 
協働による学際的なコースデザイン:東京カレッジの事例
東京カレッジは、学際的な研究、国際的なネットワークの構築、公共の場での活動を通じて、グローバル社会の差し迫った問題に取り組むことを目的として設立された、東京大学の若い研究所です。昨年の夏、東京カレッジに大量の初期キャリアの研究者が着任したため、私たちはこのミッションを教育に反映させる機会を求めていました。この講演では、大学のリベラルアーツプログラム「全学ゼミ」の枠組みの中で「2050年の地球と人間社会」と題したバイリンガルの学際的な学部ゼミを共同でデザインし、指導するという私たちの取り組みを紹介します。私たちの経験と収穫を共有し、大学内での学際的教育における将来のコラボレーションの可能性について会話を始めたいと思います。
 
 
Shiori SHAKUTO: 東京カレッジ特任助教。社会文化人類学者であり、研究テーマはジェンダー、移民、環境などです。東京カレッジ入社以前は、オーストラリアとシンガポールで、ジェンダーと開発、高齢化とテクノロジー、日本研究など、幅広い学際的なコースを教えてきました。
 
Marcin JARZEBSKI:東京カレッジの特任助教であり、持続可能性科学と自然環境科学の専門家。世界的な高齢化・縮小社会、サハラ以南のアフリカにおける食糧安全保障、東南アジアにおける気候変動への適応、フィリピンにおけるコミュニティ森林管理などについて研究し、未来社会の新しいデザインを目指した共同研究にも積極的に取り組んでいます。また、環境持続性の分野で教鞭をとる機会も何度かありました。
 
Michael FACIUS: 東京カレッジ准教授。日本と東アジアの文化を、グローバル・ヒストリー、知識の歴史、翻訳の歴史という観点から研究しています。大学教授法とeティーチングの学位を持っています。ベルリン自由大学、ユニバーシティ・カレッジ・ロンドン、東京大学で日本研究、東アジア研究、歴史学、グローバル・ヒストリー、
トランスナショナル・スタディーズ、チャイニーズ・ヘルス&ヒューマニティの分野で教鞭をとり、指導にあたってきました。また、ERASMUSのレクチャーシップとしてラ
イデンとケンブリッジでも教鞭をとりました。
 
オンライン 4月20日
17:00-18:30 (JST)
英語・日本語 同時通訳あり

UTokyo グローバル ワークショップ
協働による学際的なコースデザイン:東京カレッジの事例
東京カレッジは、学際的な研究、国際的なネットワークの構築、公共の場での活動を通じて、グローバル社会の差し迫った問題に取り組むことを目的として設立された、東京大学の若い研究所です。昨年の夏、東京カレッジに大量の初期キャリアの研究者が着任したため、私たちはこのミッションを教育に反映させる機会を求めていました。この講演では、大学のリベラルアーツプログラム「全学ゼミ」の枠組みの中で「2050年の地球と人間社会」と題したバイリンガルの学際的な学部ゼミを共同でデザインし、指導するという私たちの取り組みを紹介します。私たちの経験と収穫を共有し、大学内での学際的教育における将来のコラボレーションの可能性について会話を始めたいと思います。
 
 
Shiori SHAKUTO: 東京カレッジ特任助教。社会文化人類学者であり、研究テーマはジェンダー、移民、環境などです。東京カレッジ入社以前は、オーストラリアとシンガポールで、ジェンダーと開発、高齢化とテクノロジー、日本研究など、幅広い学際的なコースを教えてきました。
 
Marcin JARZEBSKI:東京カレッジの特任助教であり、持続可能性科学と自然環境科学の専門家。世界的な高齢化・縮小社会、サハラ以南のアフリカにおける食糧安全保障、東南アジアにおける気候変動への適応、フィリピンにおけるコミュニティ森林管理などについて研究し、未来社会の新しいデザインを目指した共同研究にも積極的に取り組んでいます。また、環境持続性の分野で教鞭をとる機会も何度かありました。
 
Michael FACIUS: 東京カレッジ准教授。日本と東アジアの文化を、グローバル・ヒストリー、知識の歴史、翻訳の歴史という観点から研究しています。大学教授法とeティーチングの学位を持っています。ベルリン自由大学、ユニバーシティ・カレッジ・ロンドン、東京大学で日本研究、東アジア研究、歴史学、グローバル・ヒストリー、
トランスナショナル・スタディーズ、チャイニーズ・ヘルス&ヒューマニティの分野で教鞭をとり、指導にあたってきました。また、ERASMUSのレクチャーシップとしてラ
イデンとケンブリッジでも教鞭をとりました。
 
オンライン 4月20日
17:00-18:30 (JST)
英語・日本語 同時通訳あり

abm00024316

Global Faculty Development Workshop: Collaborative interdisciplinary course design: a case study from Tokyo College (Dr. Shiori Shakuto, Dr. Michael Facius and Dr. Marcin Jarzebski)

Access the recording of the event here.


Report by Cecilia Grandi-Nagashiro


On April 20, 2021, GFD was honored to host a seminar in collaboration with Tokyo College, a newly established research institute at the University of Tokyo founded to address some of global society's pressing issues through interdisciplinary research, international network building, and public engagement.

 

The seminar's main topics were first introduced by Dr. Shiori and were as follows: parameters of the seminar, syllabus design, challenges, assessment, teaching a session, and take-aways. Then she talked about why they decided to teach a course even though their institute is mainly research centered. She said they wanted to provide teaching opportunities for postdocs but also wanted to encourage the building of faculty learning communities. All the professors involved in this teaching project felt it was very important for the development of Tokyo College. 


Regarding the first topic of the talk, parameters of the design of the seminar, the key points they wanted to include were co-teaching, interdisciplinarity, bilingual approach, active learning, and online teaching. 


The second topic they introduced was syllabus design, in this regard they focused the design of the course on the central research theme of their institute, which is the earth and human society in 2050. Furthermore, in regards to the structure of the course, they divided 13 sessions into four blocks assigned to nine instructors. The teaching approach used to build the course was constructive alignment, which was also mentioned by Dr. Allyn in our previous event, earlier this month. In this context, they mention that the course design has to be adjusted to the learning goals, which at the same time are based on the revised Bloom’s taxonomy in which learning goes from remembering information to creating something new with that information. For this course, the session also included different types, beyond lectures, such as case studies, exercises, and forums.  


The third topic was the challenges of designing and implementing the course. These challenges were: accessibility, coherence, and bilingual format. In terms of accessibility, they learned that the best way to mix delivery formats, have shorter sessions, and require preparation time, homework, and readings from the students. They also focused on online engagement techniques where students could talk and interact with each other. Coherence was about providing formal coherence in regards to zoom IDs, file sharing and styling, and time management among other issues. Content coherence was about keeping all topics connected and that the session’s contents in line with each other. The process was about coordination among professors. Regarding the language of the course, they tried to keep a fully bilingual format at the beginning and gradually shifted to more English towards the end.


The fourth topic was about assessment, i.e. testing the students and their results across the semester without grades. To achieve this they asked the students to tackle different topics and write about them under what they called Future Lab. Also, the students were asked to peer-review each other's work. This way, the professors could assess whether the students could use the course learning in different contexts. As a final course project, they had final presentations using the Pecha Kucha style, in which students have only 15 slides and 5 minutes to present their topic of interest. Finally, the professors also offered the students to turn their presentation into a blog article to be published in the Tokyo College blog. They highlighted a specifically successful article, titled "Toward 2050: Hospitals of the future -The role of Art" available here.


The fifth topic the professors presented was about the structure of sessions. As mentioned before they used a block style, in which they included a lecture and exercise in each block of two sessions. During the exercises, they used Google slides to check the students’ notes and see how their discussion was going. From this, they learned that working in breakout rooms went very well in this case, especially as they could get meaningful outputs from the students. 


The sixth and final topic was about takeaways and their learning from fully designing and implementing a course. In this regard, Dr. Marcin mentioned that he found that breakout rooms worked very well, that asking directly to students to talk helped with engagement, and that using interdisciplinarity in the course was a great approach to broaden the horizons of the students. Dr. Shiori said she learned that less is more, that the approach the students used to tackle social issues, such as art and music was very interesting, and that assessing learning without grades was very challenging but interesting at the same time. Dr. Michael mentioned that construction alignment was crucial for a successful course design, that communication throughout was useful in the sense of team building. Finally, the professors closed their session, noting that their future goal is to broaden their learning communities inside and outside UTokyo.



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